Internet

Unackackable Internet Unackackable Internet

Unackackable Internet – After going through several stages of the filtering process, we are finally able to enhance the articles we have collected with data from reliable sources that discuss the unhackable internet. An international team of scientists led by the University of Bristol in the UK, are making significant strides in creating an internet network that is claimed to be very secure.

Quoted from Unilad, this unique prototype can transform online communication well, and is touted as the largest quantum network of its kind.

In a report published in the scientific journal Science Advances, they describe how to use a principle known as entanglement to exploit the forces of two separate particles placed in different locations to mimic each other at exactly the same time.

This process paved the way for much better opportunities in the fields of quantum computers, sensors and information processing. Lead author of the study, Dr Siddarth Joshi, who leads the project at the University of Bristol’s Quantum Engineering Technology (QET) Labs, said this was a major breakthrough and made the quantum internet a much more realistic proposition.

“Until recently, building quantum networks was costly, time and resource intensive, and often sacrificed security which defeats the whole purpose,” he said.

That said, their solutions are scalable, relatively inexpensive, and most importantly, impenetrable. That is, it is an interesting game changer and paves the way for much faster development and widespread rollout of this technology.

Today’s internet systems rely on complex codes for information protection. Meanwhile, hackers continue to hone their skills to circumvent this system, so that cyber attacks around the world increase significantly.

Such losses are projected to soar as hackers become more proficient, and the need to seek alternatives becomes increasingly important.

For decades, quantum has been seen as a revolutionary replacement for standard encryption techniques. Physicists have developed a type of secure encryption called a quantum key distribution – which transmits particles of light, known as photons.

This process means that two users can share a secret key to encrypt and decrypt information, without the risk of being intercepted. However, to date, this technique has only proven effective between two users.

Also Read:A Brief History of the Inventor of the Internet

Instead of making physical connections (eg glass fibers) between each user, the team could build a system in which each user only had one glass fiber connected to the source of quantum entanglement.

“To date efforts to expand the network have involved extensive infrastructure and systems requiring the creation of another transmitter and receiver for each additional user,” said Joshi.

Sharing messages in this way, which are known as trusted nodes, is not good enough because it uses so much additional hardware that it can leak and is no longer completely secure.

“Instead of having to replicate the entire communication system, this new methodology, called multiplexing, separates light particles, emitted by one system, so that they can be received by multiple users efficiently,” he said.

Previous quantum systems took years to build, at costs that add up to the millions or even billions of pounds. However, this new network was created in a few months for less than £ 300,000.

A Brief History of the Inventor of the Internet A Brief History of the Inventor of the Internet

A Brief History of the Inventor of the Internet – In using the internet, you should know in advance about the brief history of the invention of the internet. The following is an article about the discovery of the internet, which is currently an alternative to finding the best information that has been summarized from trusted sources.
Internet is one part of technological development. Where everyone can easily find various kinds of information from around the world. Not only that, the internet has become a link for hundreds of millions of people in the world. Through the internet, people do work, get entertainment, make calls to video calls.

Then who actually created the internet? Who are the scientists behind the emergence of technology that is very helpful for the continuity of human life today? Of course we internet users must not forget that the tools currently in use are someone’s work.

Who would have thought that the internet has been born for decades. The history of the internet may have started when you were still not born. The internet itself has been predicted by previous scientists who envision network systems around the world. Curious about how the internet started? Check out the history here.

Internet history

Know the History of Internet Development in the World

The Internet is the result of the hard work of dozens of scientists, programmers and technicians who work together to discover new changes in technology. One scientist who predicted the emergence of information that could be found around the world was Nikola Tesla. The idea of ​​a “world wireless system” has emerged in the 1900s he has put forward.

The idea was later developed by Paul Otlet and Vannevar Brush who succeeded in creating a mechanical system. Also created an easy search system in books and media in the 1930s and 1940s. The development of the internet was very large after those years when the American government used it in the military.

The role of the internet in the military is to provide the broad and accessible data that it is today. The internet system itself comes from the Semi Automatic Ground Environment (SAGE) which is also owned by the US government military. The leader in SAGE is J.C.R Licklider who has a universal networking vision to unite humanity.
In 1958, the US government created the Advance Research Project Agency which now has a major role with ARPANet. The program that was created was also in order to become a country that led the development of technology to compete with the Soviet Union which created the Sport. ARPANet itself is used to unite multiple computers so that they can be used as a single communication tool.

Also Read :How Can The Global Internet Be Regulated

Technology continued to evolve and in 1961. Lenoard Kleinrock wrote the “Information Flow in Large Communication Nets” grace test which finally became the first step in the development of the internet at large. Technology itself continued to develop until 1970 by scientists Robert Kahn and Vinton Cerf.

They created the Transmission Control Protocol and Internet Protocol (TCP / IP). This communication model they created allows data to be sent across multiple networks. On January 1, 1983 ARPANet adopted the TCP / IP system and many scientists began working to create a ‘network to network’.

Earlier in 1971 the first computer virus called Creeper infected the ARPANet. This was written by BBN programmer Robert Thomas, who is conducting an experimental software that can scan itself. The term “internet” appeared in 1974 when TCP / IP was introduced. Starting from here the ARPANet developed rapidly and is used in various universities while being continuously developed by scientists.

How-Can-The-Global-Internet-Be-Regulated

How Can The Global Internet Be Regulated  – Beyond managing domain names and associated IP addresses, the Internet does not have much governance. Technical experts from around the world met recently in Berlin to discuss options. John Savage, the An Wang Professor of Computer Science at Brown, presented a working paper on approaches to the Internet governance question.
PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Policymakers, business leaders and technical experts from all over the world gathered recently in Berlin for the fifth Global Cyberspace Cooperation Summit. Sponsored by the German Foreign Office and the EastWest Institute, a global nonprofit focused on international conflict resolution, the summit aimed to address a wide variety of political, economic and social issues that have arisen since the global emergence of the Internet.

John Savage, the An Wang Professor of Computer Science at Brown and a professorial fellow of the EastWest Institute, was a presenter at the summit on Internet governance. Savage and Bruce McConnell, senior vice president at the EastWest Institute, contributed a working paper to the conference outlining broad recommendations for how the governance of the Internet could be structured.

Savage discussed the paper with Kevin Stacey, Brown science news officer.

Could you give us an overview of how the Internet is governed today?

The short answer is that the Internet is basically not governed. One component is governed, and that concerns domain names and the associated IP addresses. There is an organization called the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers or ICANN that supervises this process. The creation of the corporation was supported by the U.S. government, which maintains limited control over the organization. Specifically, the government has some limited control over the root zone file. When a computer encounters a domain name its never seen before, it goes to the root zone file and from there it’s directed to machines that can do the translation from domain name to IP address. The U.S. maintains some control over the file, but has announced that in about a year it plans to relinquish that control.

Over the last decade many forums have emerged to discuss issues of Internet governance, including the World Summit on the Information Society, the U.N.’s Internet Governance Forum and others. They examined an astonishing range of issues, but none of these groups has authority to make decisions. So it’s fair to say that governance of the Internet is still evolving.

There have been calls for expanding global governance of the Internet. Could you explain what types of issues that might entail?

We ask the question in our paper: What is Internet governance? The fact is that it means many things to many people. To some it means doing something about crime mediated by the Internet — fraud, identity theft, theft of intellectual property. For others it’s Internet terrorism. For others it’s human rights — freedom of expression and protection from surveillance. The list goes on.

In our paper, we outline five broad areas of concern for Internet governance. Those include network architecture (technical issues dealing with the function of the Internet), content control (issues like spam and child pornography), cybercrime, cyber attacks (terrorism and major network disruptions), and human rights.

What are some of your recommendations on how to deal with these issues?

When you think about it, so many of the issues people are looking to govern predate the Internet — crime, human rights terrorism, etc. There do exist international organizations that deal with many of these issues already. We think that existing organizations should deal with those governance matters involving the Internet that fall within their respective areas. For example, do we need a separate agency to deal with Internet-based crime and terrorism when we have Interpol and a variety of other organizations that already deal with these things? The answer in our view is no, there’s no need for that.

The problem with a lot of these agencies is that they’re not up to speed when it comes to the Internet. So we propose that these organizations should start to air these issues in forums with multiple stakeholders who have expertise in the Internet. They should bring in NGOs, corporations, and technical experts to give input on technical, political, and economic aspects to these issues. When you create multi-stakeholder organizations like these, you bring expertise that governments and agencies don’t have. As a consequence, they can make better decisions and move forward more rapidly.

For those issues dealing with the technical aspects of network architecture, we recommend multi-stakeholder oversight of existing technical organizations like ICANN. However, we recommend that oversight bodies dealing with such organizations only have the right to accept or reject technical recommendations, not change them. Such recommendations should only be modified by qualified technical people.

What are the advantages to this decentralized approach?

Internet governance today is very complex, largely because it encompasses a large variety of issues. The likelihood of reaching agreement on them increases if we can simplify the landscape. To us, that means disaggregating governance into a small set of important issues, including those we outline in the paper. That increases the odds that existing international bodies can deal with most of them. Multi-stakeholder participation in each of these bodies brings the expertise and concern found among the citizenry and nongovernmental organizations to bear on complex Internet governance issues. We would hope that that could be done in a way that encourages openness, transparency, and inclusiveness.

If one organization governs all of the Internet, some governments may be tempted to try to capture control of this organization and, thereby, have too great a say about Internet governance. For example, the governments of Russia, China, Saudi Arabia, and others have advocated consolidating Internet governance under the International Telecommunications Union, a United Nations organization that currently oversees telephony and other matters of international communications. We would argue that isn’t a good approach, given the diversity and complexity of the issues at hand.