October 17, 2020

Unackackable Internet Unackackable Internet

Unackackable Internet – After going through several stages of the filtering process, we are finally able to enhance the articles we have collected with data from reliable sources that discuss the unhackable internet. An international team of scientists led by the University of Bristol in the UK, are making significant strides in creating an internet network that is claimed to be very secure.

Quoted from Unilad, this unique prototype can transform online communication well, and is touted as the largest quantum network of its kind.

In a report published in the scientific journal Science Advances, they describe how to use a principle known as entanglement to exploit the forces of two separate particles placed in different locations to mimic each other at exactly the same time.

This process paved the way for much better opportunities in the fields of quantum computers, sensors and information processing. Lead author of the study, Dr Siddarth Joshi, who leads the project at the University of Bristol’s Quantum Engineering Technology (QET) Labs, said this was a major breakthrough and made the quantum internet a much more realistic proposition.

“Until recently, building quantum networks was costly, time and resource intensive, and often sacrificed security which defeats the whole purpose,” he said.

That said, their solutions are scalable, relatively inexpensive, and most importantly, impenetrable. That is, it is an interesting game changer and paves the way for much faster development and widespread rollout of this technology.

Today’s internet systems rely on complex codes for information protection. Meanwhile, hackers continue to hone their skills to circumvent this system, so that cyber attacks around the world increase significantly.

Such losses are projected to soar as hackers become more proficient, and the need to seek alternatives becomes increasingly important.

For decades, quantum has been seen as a revolutionary replacement for standard encryption techniques. Physicists have developed a type of secure encryption called a quantum key distribution – which transmits particles of light, known as photons.

This process means that two users can share a secret key to encrypt and decrypt information, without the risk of being intercepted. However, to date, this technique has only proven effective between two users.

Also Read:A Brief History of the Inventor of the Internet

Instead of making physical connections (eg glass fibers) between each user, the team could build a system in which each user only had one glass fiber connected to the source of quantum entanglement.

“To date efforts to expand the network have involved extensive infrastructure and systems requiring the creation of another transmitter and receiver for each additional user,” said Joshi.

Sharing messages in this way, which are known as trusted nodes, is not good enough because it uses so much additional hardware that it can leak and is no longer completely secure.

“Instead of having to replicate the entire communication system, this new methodology, called multiplexing, separates light particles, emitted by one system, so that they can be received by multiple users efficiently,” he said.

Previous quantum systems took years to build, at costs that add up to the millions or even billions of pounds. However, this new network was created in a few months for less than £ 300,000.